Royal Arms, Styles, and Titles of Great Britain: Documents

 

Contents

See also documents relating to Ireland.


Proclamation adding "king of Ireland" to the royal style
Westminster, 23 January 1542.

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 208. vol. 1, p. 307.)

WHERE we be justly and rightfully King of our realm of Ireland, and ought [see 35 Hen VIII, c. 3] to have the title, style, and name thereof by right of inheritance, and the non-use thereof in our style hath caused much disobedience, rebellion, dissension and sedition in our said realm, to the great impoverishing and peril of destruction of the same, if we had not for the redress thereof put to our kingly hand, as we have done, in such wise, as by reason thereof our said realm (thanks be to God) is now brought and reduced to better order, peace, and civility than it hath been many years past;

And forasmuch as our loving subjects of our said realm, both the prelates, nobles, and commons, do think and determine, that the good estate, peace, and tranquillity, wherein our said realm now standeth, shall the better and longer continue, if we would as we ought of right, accept and take upon us the title and name of King of the same; which to do all our said subjects, of our said realm, by their mutual assents, by authority of parliament holden within the same, have agreed and assented unto, and most instantly desired us, that the said title and name of King of Ireland, together with our said whole realm, should be united and annexed to our imperial crown of our realm of England:

To which their desires and humble requests, for the better conservation of the good peace of our said realm, we have assented., and have caused for that purpose our style to be altered and reformed, as well in the Latin as in the English tongue, as hereafter followeth: Henricus octavus dei gratia Anglie, Franciae & Hibernie rex, fidei defensor, & in terra ecclesiae Anglicanae & Hibernicae supremum caput. Henry VIII, by the grace of God King of England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and of the Church of England and also Ireland in Earth the Supreme Head.

And to the intent that our said subjects should not be ignorant of the alteration of our said style, in form as is aforesaid, we have caused this present proclamation to be made, and by the same will and command all and singular our officers, justices and ministers, and all other our subjects and residents within this our realm of England, and elsewhere within any our dominions, that they shall accept, take, and use our style, in form above written, in like form, as they used and accepted our old style before this alteration. Nevertheless, to the intent that no discord, variance, occasion, trouble, impeachment, or molestation should be had or made to any our justices, officers, ministers, and other our subjects or residents, before they may have convenient knowledge of the change and alteration of our late style; we are therefore pleased and contented, that none of our said justices, officers, ministers, subjects, or other residents within our realm of England, the dominion of Wales, Calais, and of the Isles of Jersey and Guernsey, for omitting of our said title and name of King of Ireland in writs, patents, process, or other writings, to be passed under any our seals, or for nonacceptation or misacceptation thereof, or for any offense touching the same, done or committed, or to be done or committed, before the last day of April next coming, shall be vexed, troubled, impeached, or by any wise molested or troubled, but that all writs, patents, process, or other writings that be passed or shall pass under any our seals, before the said last day of April, wherein shall happen our said title and name of King of Ireland to be omitted, shall be taken, construed, accepted, and admitted to be of the same force, strength, quality, and condition in all things, as they were before the said title and name of King of Ireland was annexed to our style. And that the non-acceptation or mis-acceptation of our said title and name of King of Ireland, or any acts or things done, or that shall chance to be done, before the said last day of April, by any our subjects or residents, touching or concerning our said title or name of King of Ireland, shall be construed and expounded any offense or occasion of trouble to any of our said subjects or residents; anything contained in this proclamation, or anything that shall be expressed in the same, or any other thing or things to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.

Proclamation announcing the regnal style of Edward VI
Westminster, 20 February 1547

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 277.5.  vol. 3, p. 282.)

OF THE MOST HIGH, Most puissant, most excellent prince and victorious King Edward, by the grace of God King of England, France, and Ireland. defender of the faith, and in earth of the Church of England supreme head, and sovereign of the most noble Order of the Garter.

Proclamation announcing the regnal style of Mary I
Westminster, 1 October 1553

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 393.5.  vol. 2, p. 12.  Their source is College of Arms, MS I.7, 36, Windsor herald's copy, published in J. R. Planché: Regal Records: Or A Chronicle of the Queen's Regnant of England (London, 1838), 26.)

OF THE MOST HIGH, most puissant, and most excellent Princess Mary the First, by the Grace of God Queen of England, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, and of the Church of England and Ireland Supreme Head.

Proclamation announcing the regnal style of Philip and Mary
Westminster, 25 July 1554

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 414.  vol. 2, p. 45.)

PHILIP AND MARY by the grace of God King and Queen of England, France, Naples, Jerusalem, and Ireland; Defenders of the Faith; Princes of Spain and Sicily; Archdukes of Austria; Dukes of Milan, Burgundy, and Brabant; Counts of Hapsburg, Flanders, and Tyrol.
Philippus et Maria, Dei Gratia Rex et Regina Angliae, Franciae, Neapolis, Hiersualem, et Hiberniae; Fidei Defensores; Principes Hispaniae et Siciliae; Archiduces Austriae; Duces Mediolani, Burgundiae, et Brabantiae; Comites Hapsburgae, Flandriae, et Tirolis.

Proclamation announcing the regnal style of Elizabeth I
Westminster, 15 January 1559

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 451.5.  vol. 2, p. 103.)

OF the most high and mighty Princess, our dread sovereign Lady Elizabeth, by the grace of God Queen of England, France, and Ireland, defender of the true, ancient, and Catholic faith, most worthy Empress from the Orkney Isles to the Mountains Pyrenée.

Proclamation concerning the Kings Majesties Stile, of King of Great Britaine, &c. 
Westminster, 20 Oct 1604.

(Source: Larkin and Hughes, Royal Stuart Proclamations. vol. 1.)

By the King.

A proclamation concerning the Kings Majesties Stile, of King of Great Britaine, &c.

[Westminster October 1604]

As often as We call to minde the most joyfull and just Recognition made by the whole body of our Realme, in the first Session of our High Court of Parliament, of that blessing which it bath pleased God to reserve many yeeres in his Providence to our Person, and now in the fulnesse of the time of his Disposition, to bestow upon Us; Namely the blessed Union, or rather Reuniting of these two mightie, famous, and ancient Kingdomes of England and Scotland, under one Imperiall Crowne: So often doe We thinke, that it is our duetie, to doe our uttermost endeavour, for the advancement and perfection of that woorke, which is of his beginning, and whereof hee hath given so many palpable signes and Arguments, as hee that seeth them not, is blinde, and hee that impugneth them, doeth but endevour to separate that, which God hath put together. For, to omit those things which are evident to sense, That the Isle within it selfe hath almost none but imaginarie bounds of separation without, but one common limit or rather Gard of the Ocean Sea, making the whole a little world within it selfe, the Nations an uniformitie of constitutions both of body and minde, especially in Martiall prowesses, A communitie of Language, the principall meanes of Civil societie, An unitie of Religion, the chiefest band of heartie Union, and the surest knot of lasting Peace: What can be a more expresse Testimonie of Gods authoritie of this worke, then that two mightie Nations, having bene ever from their first separation continually in blood each against other, should for so many yeres immediatly before our Succession, be at peace together, as it were to this end, That their memory being free from sense of the smart of former injuries, their minds might, in the time of Gods appointment, more willingly come together, That it hath pleased him so to dispose, that this Union is not inforced by Conquest and violence, nor contracted by doubtfull and deceivable points of transaction, but naturally derived from the Right and Title of the precedent Princes of both Kingdomes, concurring in our Person, alike lineally descended from the blood of both through the Sacred conjunction of Wedlocke, An Union which is the worke of God and Nature, and whereunto the workes of Force or Policie cannot attaine. Wee may adde hereunto that which We have received from those that be skilfull in the Lawes of this Land, That immediatly upon our Succession, divers of the ancient Lawes of this Realme are Ipso facto expired, As namely, that of Escuage, and of the Naturalization of the Subjects, And that there is a greater affinitie and concurrence betweene most of the ancient Lawes of both Kingdomes, then is to be found betweene those of any other two Nations, As namely, in states of Inheritance and Freehold, as Fee-simple, Fee-taile, Tenant for life, by Courtesie, Dower, and such like, In cases of descents of Inheritance, In Tenures of Lands, as of Knights service, Socage, Franke Almoigne, Burgage, Villenage, and such like, In Writts and formes of Processe, In cases of Triall by juries, Grand juries; And lastly in Officers and Ministers of justice, As Sheriffes, Coroners, and such like, which We leave to be further considered by the Commissioners of both Realmes.

All which being matter prepared onely by the Providence of Almightie God, and which by humane Industrie could not have bene so ordered; Wee, and all our Subjects ought first with reverence to acknowledge his Handie-worke therein, and to give him our most humble thankes for the same, and then to further by our endevours that, which his Wisedome doth by so many signes point out to be his Will: Whereof many particularities depending upon the determinations of the States and Parliaments of both Realmes, We leave them there to be discussed, according to the Commissions graunted by the severall Actes of both Parliaments. And some other things resting in Our owne Imperiall Power, as the Head of both, We are purposed towards the building of this excellent worke, to doe by Our selfe that, which justly and safely Wee may by Our absolute power doe. And for a first stone of this worke, whereupon the rest may be layed, seeing there is undoubtedly but one Head to both Peoples, which is Our selfe; And that unfainedly We have but one Heart and Minde to communicate equally to both States, as Lines issuing from one Center, Our justice, our Favours, and whatsoever else dependeth upon the Unitie of Our Supreme power over both, (God having ministred to Us so just cause to imbrace them both with equall and indifferent Love, in as much as Our Birth, and the first part of Our life bath been in the one, and the later part thereof is like to be for the most part in the other:) Wee thinke it unreasonable, that the thing, which is by the worke of God and Nature so much in effect one, should not be one in name; Unitie in name being so fit a meanes to imprint in the hearts of people a Character and memoriall of that Unitie, which ought to be amongst them indeede.

 Wherefore Wee have thought good to discontinue the divided names of England and Scotland out of our Regall Stile, and doe intend and resolve to take and assume unto Us in maner and forme hereafter expressed, The Name and Stile of KING OF GREAT BRITTAINE, including therein according to the trueth, the whole Island. Wherein no man Can imagine Us to be led by an humour of Vaineglory or Ambition, because wee should in that case, rather delight in a long enumeration of many Kingdomes and Seigniories, (whereof in Our Inheritance We have plentie enough, if Wee thought there were glory in that kind of Stile) but onely that Wee use it as a signification of that, which in part is already done, and a significant Prefiguration of that, which is to be done hereafter; Nor that We covet any new affected Name devised at Our pleasure, but out of undoubted knowledge doe use the true and ancient Name, which God and Time have imposed upon this Isle, extant, and received in Histories, in all Mappes and Cartes, wherein this Isle is described, and in ordinary Letters to Our selfe from divers Forraine Princes, warranted also by Authenticall Charters, Exemplifications under Scales, and other Records of great Antiquitie, giving Us president for our doing, not borowed out of Forraine Nations, but from the Actes of our Progenitors, Kings of this Realme of  England, both before and since the Conquest, having not had so just and great cause as We have.

Upon all which considerations We doe by these Presents, by force of our Kingly Power and Prerogative, assume to Our selfe by the cleerenesse of our Right, The Name and Stile of KING OF GREAT BRITTAINE, FRANCE, AND IRELAND, DEFENDER OF THE FAITH, &c. as followeth in Our just and lawfull Stile, And doe hereby publish, promulge and declare the same, to the ende that in all Proclamations, Missives forreine, and Domesticall, Treaties, Leagues, Dedicatories, Impressions, and in all other cases of like nature, the same may be used and observed. And to the ende the same may be the sooner and more universally divulged both at Home and abroad: Our will and pleasure is, That the same Stile be from hencefoorth used upon all Inscriptions upon our currant Moneys and Coynes of Gold and Silver hereafter to be Minted. And for that Wee doe not Innovate or assume to Us any new thing, but declare that which is and hath bene evident to all; Our will and pleasure is, That in such Appellations or Nominations, as shall be hereafter made by force of these presents, the same shall bee expressed in such and the same maner and forme, and after such computation, as if we had assumed and declared the same the first day of our Raigne of our Realme of England; Forbearing onely for the present that any thing herein conteined doe extend to any Legall proceeding, Instrument, or Assurance, untill further Order be taken in that behalfe.

Given at our Pallace of Westminster the twentieth day of October, in the second yeere of our Raigne of England, France and Ireland, and of Scotland the eight and thirtieth.

God save the King.


Act of Union, 1707

The Act of Union of 1707 effected the union of England and Scotland into a single kingdom, called Great Britain. I have not found any proclamation concerning the style or the arms of the sovereign or the kingdom, or the flag (for which a proclamation of 1606 already existed). What follows is the text of the first article of the Act.

I. That the two kingdoms of Scotland and England shall, upon the Ist day of May next ensuing the date hereof, and for ever after, be united into one kingdom by the name of Great Britain, and that the ensigns armorial of the said United Kingdom be such as Her Majesty shall appoint, and the crosses of St. Andrew and St. George be conjoined in such manner as Her Majesty shall think fit, and used in all flags, banners, standards and ensigns, both at sea and land.


Proclamation as to the Royal Style and Titles and as to the Ensigns Armorial, Standard, and Union Jack. 
London, January 1, 1801.

(The Times, January 3, 1801, page 4d. See also Statutory Rules & Orders and Statutory Instruments Revised to Dec 31, 1948, II 789)

By the King.
—
A Proclamation.

Declaring His Majesty's Pleasure concerning the Royal Stile and Titles appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and its Dependencies, and also the Ensigns Armorial, Flags, and Banners thereof.

George R.

Whereas by the first article of the articles of Union of Great Britain and Ireland, ratified and confirmed by two Acts of Parliament, the one passed in the Parliament of Great Britain, and the other in the Parliament of Ireland, and respectively intituled, An Act for the Union of Great Britain and Ireland, it was declared, That the said Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland should upon this day, being the 1st day of January, in the year of our Lord 1801, for ever after be united in One Kingdom, by the name of The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland; and that the Royal Stile and Titles appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the said United Kingdom and its Dependencies, and also the Ensigns Armorial, Flags, and Banners thereof, should be such as we, by our Royal Proclamation, under the Great Seal of the said United Kingdom, should appoint; we have thought fit, by and with the advice of our Privy Council, to appoint and declare that our Royal Stile and Titles shall henceforth be accepted, taken, and used, as the same are set forth in manner and form following, that is to say, the same shall be expressed in the Latin tongue by these words:—"GEORGIUS TERTIUS, Dei Gratia, Britanniarum Rex, Fidei Defensor:" GEORGE the THIRD, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith." And that the arms or ensigns armorial of the said United Kingdom shall be quarterly, first and fourth, England; second, Scotland; third, Ireland: and it is our will and pleasure, that there shall be borne therewith, on an escocheon of pretence, the arms of our Dominions in Germany ensigned with the Electoral Bonnet.  And it is our will and pleasure that the standard of the said United Kingdom shall be the same quartering as are hereinbefore declared to be the arms or ensigns armorial of the said United Kingdom, with the escutcheon of pretence thereon herein before described; and that the Union flag shall be azure, the crosses-saltires of St. Andrew and St. Patrick quarterly per saltire counterchanged argent and gules; the latter fimbriated of the second; surmounted by the cross of St. George of the third, fimbriated as the saltire.  And our will and pleasure further is, that the stile and titles aforesiad, and also the arms or ensigns armorial aforesaid, shall be used henceforth, as far as conveniently may be, on all occasions wherein our royal stile and titles and arms or ensigns armorial ought to be used.  But, nevertheless, it is our will and pleasure, that such gold, silver and copper monies as, on the day before the 1st day of January one thousand eight hundred and one, were current and lawful monies of  Great Britain, and all such gold, silver, and copper monies as shall, on or after this day, be coined by our authority with the like impressions, until our will and pleasure shall be otherwise declared, shall be deemed and taken to be current and lawful monies of the said United Kingdom in Great Britain; and that all such gold, silver, and copper monies as, on the day before the 1st day of January one thousand eight hundred and one, were current and lawful monies of Ireland; and all such  gold, silver, and copper monies as shall, on or after this day, be coined by our authority with the like impressions, until our will and pleasure shall be otherwise declared, shall be deemed and taken to be current and lawful monies of the said Kingdom in Ireland; and all such monies as shall have been coined for an issued in any of the dominions of the said United Kingdom, and declared by our Proclamation to be current and lawful money of such dominions respectively, bearing our stile, or titles, or arms, or ensigns armorial, or any part or parts thereof, and all monies which shall hereafter be coined and issued according to such Proclamations, shall continue to be lawful and current money of such dominions respectively, notwithstanding such change in our stile, titles, and arms, or armorial bearings respectively as aforesaid, until our pleasure shall be futther declared thereupon.  And all and every such monies as aforesaid shall be received and taken in payment in Great Britain and Irealand respectively, and in the dominions threunto belonging after the date of this our Proclamation, in such manner, and as of the like value and denomination as the same were received and taken before the date thereof.  And it is also our will and pleasure that the several dies and marks which have been used to denote the stamp duties, and all other stamps and marks and instruments, which, before the issuing of this our Proclamation, shall have been in actual use for any public purpose, and in which our Royal stile and titles, or our arms or ensigns armorial, or any parts or part thereof respectively, may be expressed, shall not, by reason of this our Proclamation, or any thing therein contained, be changed or altered, until the same may be conveniently so changed or altered, or until our pleasure shall be further declared thereupon: but that all such dies, stamps, marks and instruments respectively, bearing our royal title and stiles, or arms, or ensigns armorial, used before this first day of January one thousand eight hundred and one, or any parts or part of such stile, titles, or of such arms or ensigns armorial, shall have the like force and effect as the same had before the said first day of January instant.

Given at our Court at St. James's, the first day of January one thousand eight hundred and one, in the forty-first year of our reign.

GOD SAVE THE KING.


Proclamation (June 8, 1816)

(Source: National Archives, PRO 61/172. See also London Gazette n. 17149, June 29, 1816.)

By His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales
Regent of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in the
Name and on the Behalf of His Majesty.

A Proclamation

George P. R.
Whereas His Majesty, by His Royal Proclamation, bearing Date the First Day of January One thousand eight hundred and one, did, by and with the Advice of His Privy Council, amongst other Things, appoint and declare that, with the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, there should be borne, on an Escocheon of Pretence, the Arms of His Majesty's Dominions in Germany, ensigned with the Electoral Bonnet; and that the Standard of the said United Kingdom should be the same Quarterings as were therein declared to be the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the said United Kingdom, with the Escocheon of Pretencce thereon, therein before described; and that the Arms or Ensigns Armorial aforesaid should be used thenceforth, as far as conveniently might be, on all Occasions wherein His Majesty's Arms or Ensigns Armorial ought to be used : And whereas His Majesty having substituted to His antient Title of Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, the Title of King of Hanover, it is fit that an Alteration should be made in His Majesty's Arms or Ensignes Armorial; We have therefore thought fit, in the Name and on the Behalf of His Majesty, and by and with the Advice of His Majesty's Privy Council, to appoint and declare, That, instead of the Amrs of His Majesty's Dominions in Germany ensigned with the Electoral Bonnet, as directed by His Majesty's Proclamation above mentioned, there shall henceforth be used and borne, with the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of His Majesty's said United Kingdom, on an Escocheon of Pretence, the Arms of His Majesty's Dominions in Germany, ensigned with the Hanoverian Royal Crown; and that the Standard of the said United Kingdom shall be the same Quarterings, as by His Majest's said Proclamation were declared to be the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the said United Kingdom, with the Escocheon of Pretence ensigned with the said Hanoverian Royal Crown, instead of the Electoral Bonnet. But, nevertheless, it is Our Will and Pleasure, that all such Gold, Silver and Copper Monies as, on the Day before the Eighth Day of this Instant June, were current and lawful Monies of Great Britain, and all such Gold, Silver, and Copper Monies as shall, on or after this Day, be coined by Our Authority, with the like Impressions, until Our Will and Pleasure shall be otherwise declared, shall be deemed and taken to be current and lawful monies of the said United Kingdom in Great Britain; and, that all such Gold, Silver and Copper Monies as, on the Day before the Eighth Day of this Instant June, were current and lawful Monies of Ireland, and all such Gold, Silver, and Copper Monies as shall, on or after this Day, be coined by Our Authority, with the like Impressions, until Our Will and Pleasure shall be otherwise declared, shall be deemed and taken to be current and lawful Monies of the said United Kingdom in Ireland; and all such Monies as shall have been coined for, and issued in, any of the dominions of the said United Kingdom, and declared by Our Proclamation to be current and lawful money of such Dominions respectively, bearing His Majesty's Arms or Ensigns Armorial, or any Part or Parts thereof and all Monies which shall hereafter be coined and issued according to such Proclamations, shall continue to be lawful and current money of such Dominions respectively, notwithstanding such Change in His Majesty's Arms or Armorial Bearings respectively as aforesaid, until Our Pleasure shall be further declared thereupon; and all and every such Monies as aforesaid shall be received and taken in Payment in Great Britain and Ireland respectively, and in the Dominions thereunto belonging, after the Date of this Proclamation, in such manner, and as of the like Value and Denomination as the same were received and taken before the Date hereof: And it is also Our Will and Pleasure, that the several Dies and Marks which have been used to denote the Stamp Duties and all other Stamps and Marks and Instruments which before the issuing of this Proclamation, shall have been in actual Use for any Public Purpose, and in which His Majesty's Arms or Ensigns Armorial, or any Parts or Part thereof respectively may be expressed, shall not by reason of this Proclamation, or anything therein contained, be changed or altered until the same may be conveniently so changed or altered, or until Our Pleasure shall be further declared thereon; but that all such Dies, Stamps, Marks, and Instruments, respectively bearing His Majesty's Arms or Ensigns Armorial, used before this Eighth Day of June Instant, or any Parts or Part of such Arms or Ensigns Armorial, shall have the like force and effect as the same had before the said Eighth Day of July instant.

Given at the Court at Carlton House, the Eighth Day of June One thousand eight hundred and sixteen, and in the Fifty-Sixth Year of His Majesty's Reign.

God save the King.


Proclamation directing the omittance of the arms of Hanover from the Royal Arms.
London, July 26, 1837.

(Source: S.R. & O. Rev. Dec 31, 1948: vol. 2, p. 796).

By the Queen.

A Proclamation

Whereas King George the Third, by his royal proclamation, bearing date the first day of January, one thousand eight hundred and one did, by and with the advice of His Privy Council, amongst other things, appoint and declare that, with the arms or ensigns armorial of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland there should be borne on an escocheon of pretence the arms of His Majesty's dominions in Germany ensigned with the electoral bonnet, and that the standard of the said United Kingdom should be the same quarterings as were therein declared to be the arms or ensigns armorial of the said United Kingdom, with the escocheon of pretence thereon thereinbefore described; and that the arms or ensigns armorial aforesaid should be used thenceforth, as far as conveniently might be, on all occasions wherein Her Majesty's arms or ensigns armorial ought to be used; and whereas His said Majesty having, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, substituted to his ancient title of Elector of the Holy Roman Empire the title of King of Hanover, it was thought fit that an alteration should be made in His Majesty's arms or ensigns armorial, and it was therefore by and with the advice of His Majesty's Privy Council, accordingly declared, by a royal proclamation, bearing date the eighth day of June in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixteen  that instead of the arms of His Majesty's dominions in Germany ensigned with the electoral bonnet, as directed by His Majesty's proclamation above mentioned, there should thenceforth be used and borne with the arms or ensigns armorial of His Majesty's said United Kingdom, on an escocheon of pretence the arms of His Majesty's dominions in Germany ensigned with the Hanoverian royal crown and that the standard of the said United Kingdom should be the same quarterings as by His Majesty's said proclamation were declared to be the arms or ensigns armorial of the said United Kingdom, with the escocheon of pretence ensigned with the said Hanoverian crown instead of the electoral bonnet; and whereas, upon the demise of His late most sacred Majesty the German dominions of His late Majesty have passed from the crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain or [sic] Ireland, and devolved upon His Royal Highness Prince Ernest Augustus Duke of Cumberland, now King of Hanover:

 We have thought fit, by and with the of Our Privy Council, to declare that henceforth the shield or escocheon of pretence representing His late Majesty's dominions in Germany, and ensigned with the Hanoverian royal crown, shall be omitted, and the shield left to contain  the arms or ensigns armorial of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland only; but, nevertheless, it is Our will and pleasure that all such gold, silver, and copper moneys as on the day before the twenty-sixth day of this instant July were current and lawful moneys of Great Britain, and all such gold, silver, and copper moneys as shall on or after this day be coined by Our authority with  the like impressions, until Our will and pleasure shall be otherwise declared, shall be deemed and taken to be current and lawful moneys of the said United Kingdom in Great Britain; and that all such gold, silver, and copper moneys as on the day before the twenty-sixth day of this instant July were lawful moneys of Ireland, and all such gold, silver, and copper moneys as shall on or after this day be coined by Our authority, with like impressions, until Our will arid pleasure shall be otherwise declared, shall be deemed and taken to be current and lawful moneys of the said United Kingdom in Ireland; and all such moneys as shall have been coined for, and issued in, any of the dominions of the said United Kingdom, and declared by royal proclamation to be current and lawful money of such dominions respectively, bearing His late Majesty's arms or ensigns armorial, or any part or parts thereof and all moneys which shall hereafter be coined and issued according to such proclamations, shall continue to be lawful and current money of such dominions respectively, notwithstanding such change in Our arms or armorial bearings respectively as aforesaid, until Our pleasure shall be further declared thereupon, and all and every such moneys as aforesaid shall be received and taken in payment in Great Britain and Ireland respectively, and in the dominions thereunto belonging, after the date of this proclamation, in such manner, and as of the like value and denomination, as the same were received and taken before the date hereof: and it is also Our will and pleasure that the several dies and marks which have been used to denote the stamp duties, and all other stamps and marks and instruments which before the issuing of this proclamation, shall be in actual use for Any public purpose, and in which His late Majesty's arms or ensigns armorial, or any parts or part thereof respectively may be expressed, shall not by reason of this proclamation, or anything therein contained, be changed or altered until the same may be conveniently so changed or altered, or until Our pleasure shall be further declared thereon; but that all such dies, stamps, marks, and instruments, respectively bearing His late Majesty's arms or ensigns armorial, used before this twenty-sixth day of July instant, or any parts or part of such arms or ensigns armorial, shall have the like force and effect as the same had before the said twenty-sixth day of July instant.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, the twenty-sixth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, and in the first year of Our reign.

God save the Queen.


An Act to enable Her most Gracious Majesty to make an addition to the Royal Style and Titles appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies. 
39 & 40 Vict. c. 10 [27th April 1876.]

repealed, SLR 1958

WHEREAS by the Act for the Union of Great Britain and  Ireland passed in the fortieth year of the reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, chapter sixty-seven, it was provided that after such Union as aforesaid the royal style and titles appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies should be such as His Majesty by his Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom should be Pleased to appoint:

And whereas by virtue of the said Act and of a Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal, dated the first day of January one thousand eight hundred and one, the present style and titles of Her Majesty are "Victoria by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith":

And whereas by the Act for the better Government of India, passed in the session of the twenty-first and twenty-second years of the reign of Her present Majesty, chapter one hundred and six, it was enacted that the Government of India, theretofore vested in the East India Company in trust for Her Majesty, should become vested in Her Majesty and that India should thenceforth be governed by and in the name of Her Majesty, and it is expedient that there should be a recognition of the transfer of government so made by means of an addition to be made to the style and titles of Her Majesty:

Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

It shall be lawful for Her most Gracious Majesty with a view to such recognition as aforesaid of the transfer of the Government of India, by Her Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom, to make such addition to the style and titles at present appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its dependencies as to Her Majesty may seem meet.

Proclamation, respecting the Alteration of Her Majesty's Style and Titles. ["Empress of India."] 
Windsor, April 28, 1876.

(British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 67, p. 547. See also: S.R. & O. Rev. Dec 31, 1948: vol. 2, p. 796).

By the Queen.—A Proclamation.

Victoria, R.

WHEREAS an Act has been passed in the present Session of Parliament, intituled "An Act to enable Her Most Gracious Majesty to make an Addition to the Royal Style and Titles appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom. and its Dependencies," [Royal Titles Act 1876, 39 & 40 Vict. c. 10] which Act recites that, by the Act for the union of Great Britain and Ireland, it was provided that after such union the Royal style and titles appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies should be such as His Majesty by His Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom. should be pleased to appoint: and which Act also recites that, by virtue of the said Act, and of a Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal dated the 1st day of January, 1801, our present style and titles are "Victoria, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith:" and which Act also recites that, by the Act for the better government of India it was enacted that the government of India, theretofore vested in the East India Company in trust for us, should become vested in us, and that India should thenceforth be governed by us and in our name, and that it is expedient that there should be a recognition of the transfer of government so made by means of an addition to be made to our style and titles : and which Act, after the said recitals, enacts that it shall be lawful for us, with a view to such recognition as of the transfer of the government of India, by our Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom to make such addition to the style and  titles at present appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies as to its may seem meet ; we have thought fit, by and with the advice of our Privy Council to appoint and declare and we do hereby, by and with the said advice, appoint and declare that henceforth, so far as conveniently may be, on all occasions and in all instruments wherein our style and titles are used, save and except all charters, commissions, letters patent, grants, writs, appointments, and other like instruments, not extending in their operation beyond the United Kingdom, the following addition shall be made to the style and titles at present appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies : that is to say, in the Latin tongue ill these words:  "Indiae Imperatrix;" and in the English tongue in these words: "Empress of India."

And our will and pleasure further is, that the said addition shall not be made in the letters patent, grants, writs, appointments, and other like instruments, hereinbefore specially excepted.

And our will and pleasure further is, that all gold, silver,  and copper moneys now current and lawful moneys of the United Kingdom, and all gold, silver, and copper moneys which shall, on or after this day, be coined by our authority with the like impressions, shall, notwithstanding such addition to our style and titles, be deemed and taken to be current and lawful moneys of the said United Kingdom; and further that all moneys coined for and issued in any of the Dependencies of the said United Kingdom, and declared by our Proclamation to be current and lawful money of such Dependencies, respectively bearing our style or titles, or any part or parts thereof, and all moneys which shall. hereafter be coined and issued according to such Proclamation, shall notwithstanding such addition, continue to be lawful and current money of such Dependencies respectively, until our pleasure shall be further declared thereupon.

Given at our Court, at Windsor, the 28th day of April, 1876, in the 39th year of our reign.

God save the Queen.


An Act to enable His most gracious Majesty to make an Addition to the Royal Style and Titles in recognition of His Majesty's dominions beyond the seas.
1 Edw. 7. c. 15 [17th August, 1901.]

repealed, SLR 1958

BE it enacted by the King's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

1. It shall be lawful for His most gracious Majesty, with a view to the recognition of His Majesty's dominions beyond the seas, by His Royal Proclamation under the great seal of the United Kingdom issued within six months after the passing of this Act, to make such addition to the style and titles at present appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its dependencies as to His Majesty may seem fit.

2. This Act may be cited as the Royal Titles Act, 1901.

Order in Council Approving Proclamation making an Addition to the Style and Titles Appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies.
London, November 4, 1901.

(Source: S.R. & O. Rev. Dec 31, 1948: vol. 2, p. 799).

At the Court at St. James's, the 4th day of November, 1901.

PRESENT,
The King's Most Excellent Majesty in Council.

The following Draft Proclamation was this day read at the Board and approved:—

A. W. FitzRoy.

BY THE KING.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas an Act was passed in the last Session of Parliament, intituled "An Act to enable His  Most  Gracious  Majesty to make an Addition  to the Royal Style and Titles in recognition of His Majesty's Dominions beyond the Seas," [Royal Titles Act 1901, 1 Edw. 7. c. 15] which Act enacts that it shall be lawful for Us, with a view to such recognition as aforesaid of Our Dominions beyond the seas, by Our Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom issued within six months after the passing of the said Act, to make such addition to the Style and Titles at present appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies as to Us may seem fit: And whereas Our present Style and Titles are in the Latin tongue, ---Edwardus VII Dei Gratiâ Britanniarum Rex, Fidei Defensor, Indiae Imperator," and in the English tongue, ---Edward VII, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India:"

We have thought fit, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, to appoint and declare, and We do hereby, by and with the said advice, appoint and declare that henceforth, so far as conveniently may be, on all occasions and on all instruments wherein Our Style and Titles are used, the following addition shall be made to the Style and Titles at present appertaining to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies; that, is to say, in the Latin tongue, After the word "Britanniarum," these words, "et terrarum transmarinarum quae in ditione stint Britannicâ;" and in the English tongue, after the words---of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland," these words, "and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas."

And Our will and pleasure further is, that all gold, silver, and bronze moneys, now current and lawful moneys of the United Kingdom, and all gold, silver, and bronze moneys which shall, on and after this day, be coined by Our authority with the like impressions, shall, notwithstanding such addition to Our Style and Titles, be deemed and taken to be current and lawful moneys of the said United Kingdom; and further, that all moneys coined for and issued in any of the Dependencies of the said United Kingdom, and declared by Our Proclamation to be current and lawful money of such Dependencies, respectively bearing Our Style or Titles, or any Part or parts thereof, and all moneys which shall hereafter be coined and issued according to such Proclamation, shall, notwithstanding such addition, continue to be lawful and current money of such Dependencies respectively, until Our pleasure shall be further declared thereupon.

Given at Our Court at St. James's, this fourth day of Novernber, one thousand nine hundred and one, in the first year of Our reign.

God save the King.


Proclamation Declaring the Name, to Be Borne by His Majesty's Royal House and Family, and Relinquishing all German Titles. 
London, July 17, 1917.

(Source: S.R. & O. Rev. Dec 31, 1948: vol. 2, p. 800).

BY THE KING.

A Proclamation declaring that, the name of Windsor is to be borne by His Royal House and Family and relinquishing the use of all German Titles and Dignities.

George R.I.

Whereas We, having taken into consideration the name and title of Our Royal House and Family, have determined that henceforth Our House and Family shall be styled and known as the House and Family of Windsor:

And whereas We have further determined for Ourselves and for and on behalf of Our descendants and all other the descendants of Our Grandmother Queen Victoria of blessed and glorious memory to relinquish and discontinue the use of all German Titles and dignities:

And whereas We have declared these Our determinations in Our Privy Council:

Now, therefore, We, out of Our Royal Will and Authority, do hereby declare and announce that as from the date of this Our Royal Proclamation Our House and Family shall be styled and known as the House and Family of Windsor, and that all the descendants in the male line of Our said Grandmother Queen Victoria who are subjects of these Realms, other than female descendants who may marry or may have married, shall bear the said name of Windsor:

And do hereby further declare and announce that We for Ourselves and for and on behalf of Our descendants and all other the descendants of Our said Grandmother Queen Victoria who are subjects of these Realms, relinquish and enjoin the discontinuance of the use of the Degrees, Styles, Dignities, Titles and Honours of Dukes and Duchesses of Saxony and Princes and Princesses of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and all other German Degrees, Styles, Dignities, Titles, Honours and Appellations to Us or to them heretofore belonging or appertaining.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace this Seventeenth day of July, in the year of our Lord One thousand nine hundred and seventeen, and in the *Eighth year of Our Reign.

God save the King.


Proclamation concerning the Ensigns Armorial of the Dominion of Canada.
November 21, 1921.

(Source: S.R. & O. Rev. Dec 31, 1948: vol. 2, p. 801).

BY THE KING.

A Proclamation declaring His Majesty's Pleasure concerning the Ensigns Armorial of the Dominion of Canada.

George R.I.

Whereas We have received a request from the Governor General in Council of Our Dorninion of Canada that the Arms or Ensigns Armorial hereinafter described should be assigned to Our said Dominion:

We do hereby, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, and in exercise of the powers conferred by the first Article, of the Union with Ireland Act, 1800, appoint and declare that the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the Dominion of Canada shall be Tierced in fesse the first and second divisions containing the quarterly coat following, namely, 1st, Gules three lions passant guardant in pale or, 2nd, Or a lion rampant within a double tressure flory-counter-flory gules, 3rd, Azure a harp or stringed argent, 4th, Azure three fleurs-de-lis or, and the third division Argent three maple leaves conjoined on one stem proper. And upon a Royal helmet mantled argent doubled gules the Crest, that is to say, On a wreath of the colours argent and gules a lion passant guardant or imperially crowned proper and holding in the dexter paw a maple leaf gules.  And for Supporters On the dexter a lion rampant or holding a lance argent, point or, flying therefrom to the dexter the Union Flag, and on the sinister A unicorn argent armed crined and unguled or, gorged with a coronet composed of crosses-patée and fleurs-de-lis a chain affixed thereto reflexed of the last, and holding a like lance flying therefrom to the sinister a banner azure  three or; the whole ensigned with the Imperial Crown proper and below the shield upon a wreath composed of roses, thistles, shamrocks and lilies a scroll azure inscribed with the motto—A mari usque ad mare, and Our Will and Pleasure further is that the Arms or Ensigns Armorial aforesaid shall be used henceforth, as far as conveniently may be, on all occasions wherein the said Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the Dominion of Canada ought to be used.

Given it Our Court it Buckingham  Palace, this Twenty-first day of November, in the year of Our Lord One thousand nine hundred and twenty-one, and in the Twelfth year of Our reign,

God save the King.


An Act to provide for the alteration of the Royal Style and Titles and of the Style of Parliament and for purposes incidental thereto.
17 Geo. 5. c. 4 [12th April 1927.]

section 1 repealed, SLR 1950; section 2 repealed in part, SL(R) 1977, c. 18, s. 1(1), sch. 1 pt. XIX: Interpretation, 1978, c. 30 s 25(1), sch. 3

BE it enacted by the King's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows :—

1. It shall be lawful for His Most Gracious Majesty, by His Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the Realm, issued within six months after the passing of this Act, to make such alteration in the style and titles at present appertaining to the Crown as to His Majesty may seem fit.

2.-(1) Parliament shall hereafter be known as and styled the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; and accordingly, the present Parliament shall be known as the Thirty-fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, instead of the Thirty-fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

(2) In every Act passed and public document issued after the passing of this Act the expression "United Kingdom" shall, unless the context otherwise requires, mean Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

3. This Act may be cited as the Royal and Parliamentary Titles Act, 1927.

PROCLAMATION by His Majesty the King altering the Style and Titles appertaining to the Crown.
London, May 13, 1927.

(British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 126, p. 44; citing the "London Gazette," May 13, 1927.)

George R.I.

WHEREAS by "The Royal and Parliamentary Titles Act, 1927," it is enacted that it shall be lawful for us by our Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the Realm issued within 6 months after the passing of the said Act to make such alteration in the style and titles at present appertaining to the Crown as to us may seem fit;

And whereas our present style and titles are, in the Latin tongue, "Georgius, V Dei Gratia Britanniarum et terrarum transmarinarum quae in ditione sunt Britannica Rex, Fidei Defensor, Indiae Imperator," and in the English tongue. "George V by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India";

And whereas we have received a recommendation from the representatives of our Governments, in conference assembled that our style and titles should he altered as in manner hereinafter appearing:

We have thought fit, and we do hereby appoint and declare, by and with the advice of our Privy Council, that: henceforth so far as conveniently may be, on all occasions and in all instruments wherein our style and titles are used, the following alteration shall be made in the style and titles at present appertaining to the Crown, that is to say, in the Latin tongue, for the word - Britanniarum - there shall be substituted the words - Magnae Britanniae, Hiberniae," and in the English tongue, for the words "the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of" the words "Great Britain, Ireland and".

Given at our Court at Buckingham Palace, this 13th day of May, in the year of our Lord 1927, and in the 18th year of our reign.

God Save the King.


India Independence Act (10 & 11 Geo. 6. c. 30) and Order in Council Approving Proclamation Altering the Style and Titles Appertaining to the Crown by Omitting the Words "Emperor of India".
22 June 1948.

India Independencce Act (excerpt)

(Source: British and Foreign State Papers, 1947, part I, p. 162.)

Act of Parliament to make provision for the setting up in India of two independent Dominions, to substitute other provisions for certain provisions of the Government of India Act, 1935, which apply outside those Dominions, and to provide for other matters consequential on or connected with the setting up of those Dominions

[10 & 11 Geo. 6. c. 30; July 18, 1947]

Be it enacted ...
7. (2) The assent of the Parliament of the United Kingdom is hereby given to the omission from the Royal Style and Titles of the words "Indiae Imperator" and the words "Emperor of India" and to the issue by His Majesty for that purpose of His Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the Realm.

Order in Council

(Source: S.R. & O. Rev. Dec 31, 1948: vol. 2, p. 803).

At the Court at Buckingham Palace, the 22nd day of June, 1948.

PRESENT,
The King's Most Excellent Majesty in Council.

The following draft Proclamation was this day read at the Board and approved.

E. C. E. Leadbitter.

BY THE KING.

A PROCLAMATION.

George R.

Whereas at the time of the coming into force of the Indian Independence Act, 1947, Our Style and Titles were, in the Latin tongue, "Georgius VI Dei Gratia Magnae Britanniae, Hiberniae et terrarum transmarinarum quae in ditione sunt Britannica Rex, Fidei Defensor, Indiae Imperator", and in the English tongue, "George VI by the Grace of God of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India":

We have thought fit, and do hereby appoint and declare, that, so far as conveniently may be, on all occasions and in all instruments wherein Our Style and Titles are used, in the Latin tongue, the words "Indiae Imperator", and, in the English tongue, the words " Emperor of India" shall be omitted.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this Twentysecond day of June, in the year of Our Lord One thousand nine hundred and forty-eight, and in the Twelfth year of Our reign.

God Save the King.


An Act to provide for an alteration of the Royal Style and Titles. 
1 & 2 Eliz. 2 c. 9   [26th March 1953.]

WHEREAS it is expedient that the style and titles at present appertaining to the Crown should be altered so as to reflect more clearly the existing constitutional relations of the members of the Commonwealth to one another and their recognition of the Crown as the symbol of their free association and of the Sovereign as the Head of the Commonwealth:

And whereas it was agreed between representatives of Her Majesty's Governments in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Union of South Africa, Pakistan and Ceylon assembled in London in the month of December, nineteen hundred and fifty-two, that there is need for an alteration thereof which, whilst permitting of the use in relation to each of those countries of a form suiting its particular circumstances, would retain a substantial element common to all:

Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons in this present Parliament assembled and by the authority of the same as follows:

1. The assent of the Parliament of the United Kingdom is hereby given to the adoption by Her Majesty, for use in relation to  the United Kingdom and all other the territories for whose foreign  relations Her Government in the United Kingdom is responsible, of such style and titles as Her Majesty may think fit having regard to the said agreement, in lieu of the style and titles at present appertaining to the Crown, and to the issue by Her for that purpose of Her Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the Realm.

2. This Act may be cited as the Royal Titles Act, 1953.

ROYAL PROCLAMATION reciting the altered Style and Titles of the Crown.
London, 29th May, 1953

(British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 160, p. 2; citing the Eleventh Supplement of The London Gazette of 26th May, 1953.)

BY THE QUEEN

A PROCLAMATION

ELIZABETH R.

WHEREAS there has been passed in the present Session of Parliament the Royal Titles Act, 1953 [1 & 2 Eliz. 2. c.9], which Act recites that it is expedient that the style and titles at present appertaining to the Crown should be altered so as to reflect more clearly the existing constitutional relations of the members of the Commonwealth to one another and their recognition of the Crown as the symbol of their free association and of the Sovereign as the Head of the Commonwealth, and which Act also recites that it was agreed between representatives of Her Majesty's Governments in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Union of South Africa, Pakistan and Ceylon assembled in London in the month of December, nineteen hundred and fifty-two, that there is need for an alteration thereof which, whilst permitting of the use in relation to each of those countries of a form suiting its particular circumstances, would retain a substantial element common to all:

And Whereas by the said Act the assent of the Parliament of the United Kingdom was given to the adoption by Us, for use in relation to the United Kingdom and all other the territories for whose foreign relations Our Government in the United Kingdom is responsible, of such style and titles as We may think fit having regard to the said agreement, in lieu of the style and titles at present appertaining to the Crown, and to the issue by Us for that purpose of Our Royal Proclamation under the Great Seal of the Realm:

We have thought fit, and We do hereby appoint and declare, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, that so far as conveniently may be, on all occasions and in all instruments wherein Our style and titles are used in relation to all or any one or more of the following, that is to say, the United Kingdom and all other the territories for whose foreign relations Our Government in the United Kingdom is responsible, Our style and titles shall henceforth be accepted, taken and used as the same are set forth in manner and form following, that is to say, the same shall be expressed in the English tongue by these words:—

"Elizabeth II, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith ".

And in the Latin tongue by these words:—

" Elizabeth II, Dei Gratia Britanniarum Regnorumque Suorum Ceterorum Regina, Consortionis Populorum Princeps, Fidei Defensor ".

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this twenty-eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord One thousand nine hundred and fifty-three, and in the Second year of Our Reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN


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