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250,449/1

31st March 1914
Misc. Gen.

Foreign Office.

Status of Issue of H.R.H. Duke of Brunswick.

Forward for observations a request from the Minister of State of Brunswick for an authoritative written statement as to the status, in H.M.'s view, of the son born to the Duke of Brunswick on 18th March. Is he a prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with the style Royal Highness.

Minutes

Placed within are copies of :-The documents relating to

1. H.M.'s consent in 1913 to the marriage of "His Royal Highness Prince Ernest Augustus Christian George, born Prince of Great Britain and Ireland.........." [the description of the "high contracting parties" was approved by F.O. see 235665]

2. The F.O. correspondence of February leading to the instruct ions to H.M. Ambassador at Berlin to attend at Brunswick,either personally or by deputy, on the occasion of the birth. The Brunswick Minister of State in his letter of Feb. 13  speaks of "His Royal Highness Duke Ernest Augustus of Brunswick and Luneburg, Prince of Great Britain and Ireland"

3. The documents relating to the registration of the birth in the P.C.O. records. The Order of the Privy Council (April 1.) uses the style "His Roval Highness ... Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland" of the Duke of Brunswick.

4. Letters Patent of 1864, regulating the use of the style "Royal Highness."

See memo within.
? To Garter for obs. J.F.H. 15/4/14

AJE
15.4.14

Wrote Sir A.S. Scott-Gatty
16.4.14


Berlin,
February 16,  1914.

No,16 Treaty.

Sir,

I have the honour to transmit, herewith, translation of a Note which I have received from the Minister of State at Brunswick respecting the approaching confinement of Her Royal Highness the Duchess Victoria Louisa of Brunswick and Luneburg.

I have the honour to request that I may receive instructions as to the reply which I should return to this communication.

I have the honour to be, with the highest respect,
Sir,
Your most obedient,
humble Servant,

(Sd.) N.E.Goschen.

The Right Hon.
Sir Edward Grey, Bart., K.G.,
etc.        etc.        etc.

Translation.

Brunswick.
February 13, 1914.

I have been commanded by His Royal Highness Duke Ernest Augustus of Brunswick and Luneburg, Prince of Great Britain and Ireland, my gracious Ruler, to request Your Excellency to be so good as to bring to the knowledge of the competent department of the Government of His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland, Your Excellency's most gracious Sovereign, that Her Royal Highness the Duchess Victoria Louisa of Brunswick and Luneburg, is expecting her confinement about the 10th of March next  in the Ducal Palace at Brunswick.

I venture to request Your Excellency to move Your Excellency's Government to cause the measures which are customary in such cases to be taken for the purpose of establishing the fact of the confinement of Her Royal Highness the Duchess.  On the occasion of the birth of His Royal Highness the Duke, my gracious Ruler, on November 17th 1887, Your Excellency's Government despatched for this purpose the Charge d'Affaires,  Mr. E. Constantine Phipps to Penzing where the birth took place. It would be welcomed by my Government if a representative could shortly be deputed to attend here as on the former occasion. As soon as the representative has been nominated,  I should be in a position to put myself into communication with him regarding the further steps to be taken.

Your Excellency will allow me to avail myself of  this auspicious occasion to assure Your Excellency of my most distinguished consideration, with which I ever remain Your Excellency's most humble Servant,
(Signed)  
C.Wolff
Minister of State.


FOREIGN OFFICE,
February 26th,  1914.
Copy
Treaty.
No.24.
(7304/14).

Sir,
I have received Your Excellency's despatch No.16 Treaty of the 16th instant in which you enclose a copy of a note from the Minister of State of Brunswick announcing that Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Brunswick and Luneburg expects to he confined at Brunswick about the 10th of next month.

In reply I have to state toYour Excellency that I have received the King's commands to the effect that you should attend personally at Brunswick when Her Royal Highness' confinement takes place, if you are at Berlin at the time; but that if you are unable to do so the Counsellor of His Majesty's Embassy should attend in your stead.

It is His Majesty's wish that the proper formalities should be observed upon this occasion, and Your Excellency should upon receiving this instruction make arrangements for receiving due notification of the date at which you should arrive at Brunswick.

It will be your duty, or that of the Counsellor of Embassy who in your absence may represent you,  to repair as soon as you hear of the event having taken place, to the Ducal Palace, and there to draw up a Certificate of the Birth, which should be dated on the day of the Birth, and should be forwarded to this Office, accompanied by a Medical Certificate from the Physician in attendance.

You are authorised to charge the expenses  incurred in this behalf  in your Account of Extraordinary Expenses,  as those of a journey undertaken on the public service.

I am, with great truth and respect,
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble Servant,

His Excellency
The Right Honourable Sir E.Goschen,  G.C.B. ,G.C.M.G.


CERTIFICATE.

I, professor doctor Krukenberg, director of the women's clinics at the Ducal hospital, Brunswick, do hereby certify, that at Brunswick on this eighteenth day of March 1914 her Royal Highness Victoria Louisa, Duchess of Brunswick and Lueneburg,was delivered at the Ducal palace of Brunswick of a sound child of the male sex and that I assisted as medical adviser at the time of the delivery.
Brunswick.

March 18, 1914.

Krukenberg.



BRITISH EMBASSY,
BERLIN.

WE the Undersigned, Sir Horace Rumbold, a Baronet of the United Kingdom, a Member of the Royal Victorian Order, Counsellor of His Britannic Majesty's Embassy at Berlin and His Excellency C. Wolff, Minister of State at Brunswick, President of the Ducal Ministry of State, Knight Grand Cross of the Ducal Order of Henry the Lion, certify that Her Royal Highness the Duchess Victoria Louisa Adelaide Mathilda Charlotte of Brunswick and Luneburg, Princess of Prussia, Consort of His Royal Highness Duke Ernest Augustus of Brunswick and Luneburg, Prince of Great Britain and Ireland, was delivered this morning at the hour of five of a living child of the male sex which was presented to us six hours and a quarter after its birth in the Ducal Palace at Brunswick by the Doctor Krukenberg with whose assistance the delivery was accomplished.
Done at Brunswick on the eighteenth day of March in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and fourteen.

Horace Rumbold.
Carl Wolff.


AT THE COUNCIL CHAMBER,  WHITEHALL,

The 1st day of April, 1914.

By the Lords of His Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council.

UPON reading this day at the Board a copy of a Dispatch to the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs from His Majesty's Ambassador at Berlin, transmitting a Certificate to the effect that Her Royal Highness the Duchess Victoria Louisa Adelaide Mathilda Charlotte of Brunswick and Lüneburg, Princess of Prussia, Consort of His Royal Highness Duke Ernest Augustus Christian George of Brunswick and Lüneburg, Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, was delivered in the Ducal Palace at Brunswick of a Prince on the 18th March, 1914; and also a Certificate of Professor Krukenberg, the Physician in attendance :

IT was ordered  by their Lordships that the said Certificates be inserted in the Council Book.

ALMERIC FITZROY.

AT THE COURT AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE,

The 17th day of March, 1913.
PRESENT,
THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT  MAJESTY

LORD PRESIDENT
VISCOUNT KNOLLYS
LORD STAMFORDHAM
MR. HERBERT SAMUEL.

HIS MAJESTY  was this day pleased  to make the following Declaration.

ALMERIC FITZROY.

My Lords,
I wish to declare My Consent to a Contract of Matrimony between His Royal Highness Prince Ernest Augustus Christian George, born Prince of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg, only surviving son of His Royal Highness The Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, K.G., and Her Royal Highness Princess Victoria Louise Adelaide Mathilde Charlotte, born Princess of Prussia, only daughter of His Majesty The German Emperor, King of Prussia, K.G., which Consent I have caused to be signified under the Great Seal and to be entered in the Books of the Privy Council.


AT THE COURT AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE,

The 17th day of March, 1913.

PRESENT.
THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY
LORD PRESIDENT
VISCOUNT KNOLLYS
LORD STAMFORDHAM
MR. HERBERT SAMUEL.

WHEREAS His Majesty in Council was this day pleased, in pursuance of the provisions of an Act passed in the twelfth year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Third, intituled " An Act for the better regulating the future Marriages of the " Royal Family," to declare His Consent to a Contract of Matrimony between His Royal Highness Prince Ernest Augustus Christian George, born Prince of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg, only surviving son of His Royal Highness The Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, K.G., and Her Royal Highness Princess Victoria Louise Adelaide Mathilde Charlotte, born Princess of Prussia, only daughter of His Majesty The German Emperor, King of Prussia, K.G., which Consent His Majesty had caused to be signified under the Great Seal.

HIS MAJESTY was, thereupon, pleased to order, as it is hereby ordered, that the Instrument (a copy whereof is hereunto annexed), signifying His Majesty's Consent as aforesaid be entered in the Books of the Privy Council in pursuance of the further provisions of the afore-mentioned Act passed in the twelfth year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Third.

ALMERIC FITZROY.


GEORGE R.I.
George the Fifth, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, King, Defender of the Faith, to all to whom these Presents shall come, sendeth Greeting !

Whereas by an Act of Parliament intituled " An Act for the better regulating the future Marriages of the Royal Family" it is amongst other things enacted "that no descendant of the body of His late Majesty King George the Second, Male or Female (other than the issue of Princesses who have married, or may hereafter marry, into Foreign Families) shall be capable of contracting Matrimony without the previous consent of His Majesty, His Heirs or Successors signified under the Great Seal" :

NOW KNOW YE that We have consented and do by these Presents signify Our Consent to the contracting of Matrimony between His Royal Highness Prince Ernest Augustus Christian George, born Prince of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg, only surviving son of His Royal Highness The Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, K.G., and Her Royal Highness Princess Victoria Louise Adelaide Mathilde Charlotte, born Princess of Prussia, only daughter of His Majesty The German Emperor, King of Prussia,  K.G.

In Witness whereof We have caused Our Great Seal to be affixed to these Presents.

Given at Our Court at Saint James's the Seventeenth day of March, 1913, in the Third year of Our Reign,
BY THE KING OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND AND OF THE BRITISH DOMINIONS BEYOND THE  SEAS.

SIGNED  WITH  HIS  OWN  HAND.


250449

No.86, Treaty.

BERLIN,
March 18th,. 1914.

Sir,

The Minister of State of Brunswick has enquired whether the Prince or Princess whose birth is expected at Brunswick will be considered by The King to be a Prince or Princess of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland with the style of Royal Highness. The Minister of State agrees that The King's wish that the proper formalities should be observed on the occasion of the confinement of Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Brunswick and Lüneburg would seem to indicate that the Prince or Princess to be born will have the status indicated above.

His Excellency would, however, bo glad to be furnished by mo with an authoritative and written statement as to the status in His Majesty's eyes of the issue of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Brunswick and Lüneburg,  and I have accordingly the honour to request instructions on the subject,

I have the honour to be, with the highest respect,
Sir,
Your most obedient, humble Servant,

(sg) N. E. Goschen

The Rt.Honble.
Sir Edward Grey, Bart, K.G., M.P,
etc, etc,  etc,


250449
Foreign Office March 31,  1914.

Sir:-
I am directed by Secretary Sir E. Grey to transmit herewith to be laid before Mr. Secretary McKenna a copy of a despatch from His Majesty's Ambassador at Berlin, respecting a request which His Excellency has received from the Minister of State of Brunswick to be furnished with an authoritative and written statement as to the status, in His Majesty's view, of the issue of His Royal Highness the Duke of Brunswick, Prince of Great Britain's and Ireland.

Sir E. Grey would be glad to be favoured with Mr. McKenna's observations on the request thus made, and to learn his opinion as to whether an authoritative and written statement in the sense desired can be furnished to the Minister of State of Brunswick.

I am, Sir,
Your most obedient, humble Servant.

Ralph Paget


The Under Secretary of state, Home Office.


250,449/1.

16th. April 1914.
Sir,

I am directed by the Secretary of State to forward to you herewith a copy of a letter and enclosure received from the Foreign Office, and to say that he would be much obliged for your observations as to the answer which should be given to the Minister of State of Brunswick in regard to the statue and style of the infant son of the Duke of Brunswick.

I am also to enclose for your information copies of the English official documents relating to His Majesty's consent in 1913 to the marriage of the Duke of Brunswick, and to the insertion in theBook of the Privy Council of the certificate of the birth of a son to the Duke.
I am,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,


<unsigned>

Mr A.S. Scott-Gatty, K.C.V.O., College of Arms,
Queen Victoria Street,
E.  C.

1. The question of the right to use the style  'Royal Highness' is a simple one, as it is governed by the letters patent of 1864. From the terms of that warrant it is clear that the Duke of Brunswick's son cannot be called "Royal Highness",  as he is the fifth generation from George III. It would also seem that the use of the style by the Duke of Brunswick himself is technically irregular:  it has been given to him, however, in English official documents, and it would be impossible to disturb it now. The answer on this point therefore should apparently be to the effect that under the terms of the warrant of Queen Victoria, the style Royal Highness cannot be used by this infant, as he is too far removed in descent from a reigning sovereign of the United Kingdom. His style by English custom is "Highness".

2. The question of the style "Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland" is less simple.

The title Prince is a modern one in England: the latest edition of the Encyclopaedia:Britannica (article 'Prince') says "In Great Britain "prince" and "princess" as titles are confined to members of the Royal Family, though non-royal duke are so described in their formal style. Nor is this use of great antiquity: the custom of giving the courtesy title of "prince" to all male descendants of the sovereign to the third and fourth [ the authority for this limitation is not clear.] generation being of modern growth and quite foreign to English traditions". 

According to Murray's Oxford Dictionary Prince means  "a male member of a Royal Family; especially in Great Britain a son or grandson of a King or Queen". The authority given for this latter limitation  is the Encyclopaedia Britannica,  1885 (Vol.XIX, page 738) "In England it was considered necessary only about a quarter of a century ago [i.e. about 1864]  to make express provision by royal authority that the titles of "prince"  and "princess"  should be enjoyed by the children of the sons as well as by the  sons and daughters of any  sovereign of the United Kingdom."

This seems to be a reference to the Letters Patent of 1864, as no other warrant can be traced: there is no reference to any such other document either in the Home Office or in Halsbury's Laws of England (Vol.VI:  Constitutional Law (Part IV- The Royal Family) p.364). If so, the statement in the Encyclopaedia Britannica of 1885 is wrong: the Letters Patent of 1864 do not define who is or is not a  'Prince' or 'Princess', but limit the style "Royal Highness" to certain princes and princesses who would otherwise be called "Highness". The style  'Prince'  (as meaning a member of the Royal Family) seems to be rightly given to this infant, who is a member of the Royal Family for the purposes of the Royal Marriage Act of 1772.

The Letters Patent of 1864 speak of the "Princes and Princesses of the Royal Family descended from and in lineal succession to the Crown"  and contemplate the use of the title Prince with a Christian name [cf. the terms of the warrant in regard to the daughters of the Princess Royal in 1905 (134513)]: (In Burke the style "Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland" appears among the titles of the Duke of Connaught and the Duke of Albany,  and the style  'A Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland' among the titles of the Duke of Cumberland:  but we have no records to show how this style came to be used.).

The style of the present Duke of Brunswick has varied in recent English official documents, as will be seen from the minutes on the first page.

It seems anomalous that a child so remote from the succession should enjoy a title "Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland", which sounds more honorific than any enjoyed by the Heir to the Throne. Possibly some such such style as "His Highness Prince  (Christian names), born a prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland" would give satisfaction in Brunswick,  the words "of the United Kingdom etc."  being regarded  as explanatory of the "Prince".

It would be used  in a foreign country where the significance of 'Prince' alone  (as meaning membership of the English Royal Family), would not be obvious.


250,449/2

20th April 1914.

Garter King of Arms.

Title of Son of Duke of Brunswick.

States that he is not entitled to be styled "Royal Highness", but is "born a Prince of Great Britain and Ireland".

Minutes

I have spoken to Garter about this.  It seems quite clear that under the present rules the Duke's son is not entitled to the style "Royal Highness", and Garter at first felt doubtful whether strictly he is even entitled to "Highness".  There is no written authority on the point, but it would seem from the preamble of the Letters Patent of 1864, that "Highness" would be right, and Garter on being referred to the letters patent agreed.

There is also no rule as to the use of such a style as "Prince of the U/K. of Great Britain and Ireland."  The Duke's son is a prince of the blood royal, and it would be right to style him 'prince' as meaning a member of the royal family" possibly also to add the explanatory words "of the Blood Royal of the U.K. of Gt Britain & Ireland" / "of the U.K. of Gt Britain & Ireland" to explain from what royal family the style is derived.  At the same time this style sounds higher than "prince of Wales".

Garter suggested that, as the question is obscure, the simplest course is that H.M. should settle a style, which could then be recorded by warrant.

? Lay before H.M. for H.M.'s pleasure on the question of the answer to be given to the request of the Brunswick Minister of State for an authoritative statement of the status and style of the Duke of Brunswick's son.
J.F.H.
22/4/14

I agree. So far as his English status is concerned, it seems that properly his designation is "a Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland" (more fully "a Prince of the Royal Family of etc" or "a Prince of the Blood Royal of &c", but these seem too long, and the shorter designation has the sanction of precedent).  and his style is "His Highness".
M.D. 23/4

Garter agrees.

I agree.  As he is of the fifth generation from George III, the express authority of H.M. is necessary for the designation and style.
A.J.
23.4.14

S of S
R.L.
24.4.14

The King approved of "His Highness" and "a Prince of the U.K. of Great Britain and Ireland". S.
25.4.14

Wrote F.O.
29.4.14


250,449/2.

College of Arms, E.C.
20th April 1914.

Sir,

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th instant (number 250,449/1) forwarding to me a copy of a letter with enclosure from the Foreign Office, together with copies of the English official documents relating to the King's Consent in 1913 to the Marriage of the Duke of Brunswick and to the insertion in the Book of the Privy Council of the certificates of the birth of a Son to the Duke.  These last mentioned are herewith returned. With regard to the enquiry by the Minister of State of Brunswick I beg to point out that in this Country the title of Royal Highness (unless specially conferred) appertains to The Sovereign's sons and daughters, sons and daughters of the Sovereign's sons,  the Sovereign's brothers and sisters, and uncles and aunts on the fathers' side. In 1898 Letters Patent under the Great Seal were granted declaring that the children of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales shall at all times have the title of Royal Highness. As the Prince born at the Ducal Palace at Brunswick on the 18th ultimo does not come under any of the abovementioned categories he is not entitled to be styled "Royal Highness". He is, however, born a Prince of Great Britain and Ireland. (or, more fully, "of the U.K. of Gt. Brit. & Ireland" says Garter)

I am,
Sir,  
Yours faithfully,
A. S. Scott-Gatty
Garter

The Under Secretary of State, Home Office.

250,449/2.

29th April, 1914.

Sir,
With reference to your letters of the 31st ultimo and 21st instant respecting the status and style in this country of the issue of the Dukes of Brunswick, I am directed by Mr. Secretary McKenna to say, for the information of Secretary Sir Edward Grey, that he has had the honour of laying the matter before His Majesty, who has been pleased to direst that the style of the infant son of the Duke of Brunswick shall be "His Highness" and that his designation shall be "A Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland".

A Warrant for the purpose of giving formal effect to His Majesty's commands is in course of preparation.

In this connection it may be of interest to point out that the general question of the right to use the style "Royal Highness in this country is regulated by Letters Patent of 1864, of which I enclose a copy.

I am,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,

<unsigned>

The Under Secretary of State
Foreign Office.


250,449/3


21 April 1914
Foreign Office

Status of the issue of H.R.H. the Duke of Brunswick

For reply to letter of 31st ult. HM ambassador at Berlin will proceed to Brunswick on 9th May to attend the christening; and H.O. is desired in good time.

Minutes

The Foreign Office will let me know as soon as possible the Christian names of the young prince.
? 1/5

this information will be wanted if the warrant is to refer solely to the infant Prince; but a general warrant as in the case of the children of Princess Henry of Battenberg would seem to be called for.  The draft of such a warrant is enclosed.
? 2/5

The warrant seems to be satisfactory.  It does not seem necessary to mention the young prince by name.  Perhaps we had better ask the F.O. if they agree to a general warrant of this kind.  If so, the papers can go to the Palace with a warrant for signature if H.M. approves.
? write F.O. accordingly
H.B.S. 5/5/14

Probably the warrant had better be in general terms, as it will prevent similar requests in future in respect of any further issue: the amended draft seems to do what is wanted.
? Inform Garter that HM was pleased to direct that the son of the Duke shd be styled 'Highness' and should have the title 'A Prince of the UK of Gt Brit. & Ireland.'  A warrant giving effect to the decision has bee ndrafted and before it is submitted to HM, SoS wd be obliged for his obs.ons.
J.F.H.
8/5/14
AJE
8.5.14
M.D. 8/5
Wrote Garter
12.5.14


250,449/3


12699/14

Foreign Office
April 21st,  1914.

Sir:-
With reference to the letter from this Office of the 31st ultimo, I am directed by Secretary Sir E. Grey to request that he may be favoured as soon as possible with a reply to the enquiry made by the Minister of State of Brunswick as to the status of the issue of His Royal Highness the Duke of Brunswick, Prince of Great Britain and Ireland.

As His Majesty's Ambassador at Berlin will he proceeding to Brunswick on May 9th to attend the Christening of the Prince recently horn to His Royal Highness, it is desirable that His Excellency should he informed in good time of the decision arrived at with regard to the question raised.

I am,
Sir,
Your most obedient,
humble Servant,

Ralph Paget

The Under Secretary of State,
Home Office.


12699/14
Immediate.

FOREIGN OFFICE
April 21st,  1914.

Sir:-
With reference to the letter from this Office of the 31st ultimo, I am directed by Secretary Sir E. Grey to request that he may he favoured as soon as possible with a reply to the enquiry made by the Minister of State of Brunswick as to the status of the issue of His Royal Highness the Duke of Brunswick, Prince of Great Britain and Ireland.

As His Majesty's Ambassador at Berlin will be proceeding to Brunswick on May 9th to attend the Christening of the Prince recently born to His Royal Highness, it is desirable that His Excellency should be informed in good time of the decision arrived at with regard to the question raised.

I am,
Sir,  
Your most obedient, humble Servant,
Ralph Paget


The Under Secretary of State, Home Office.

250,449/3

12th May, 1914.

Sir,

With reference to your letter of the 20th ultimo, I am directed by the Secretary of State to say that the King was pleased to command that the style of the infant son of the Duke of Brunswick should be "His Highness" and that the designation should be "A Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland'

A warrant in general terms giving effect to His Majesty's commands has been prepared, and before it is submitted for signature, I am to request that you will be good enough to favour the Secretary of State with any observations you nay have to offer thereon.

I am,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,



Sir A. S. Scott-Gatty, K.C.V.O.,
College of Arms,
Queen Victoria Street


George the Fifth, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas KING, Defender of the Faith, To Our Right Trusty and Right Entirely Beloved Cousin and Counsellor Henry, Duke of Norfolk, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight Grand Cross of Our Royal Victorian Order, Earl Marshal and Our Hereditary Marshal of England,
Greeting !
Whereas on the Eighteenth day of March last past, at the Ducal Palace of Brunswick, a son was horn of the marriage of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Brunswick and Luneburg :
And whereas We are desirous of defining and fixing the style by and designation which the issue of the said marriage shall be designated enjoy within our Dominions:
Now Know Ye that We do hereby declare and ordain that the children born to Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Brunswick and Luneburg shall at all times hold and enjoy the style and attribute of "Highness" with their titular dignity of Prince or Princess prefixed to their respective Christian names, or with any titles of honour which may belong to them :
And We do hereby further declare and ordain that the designation of the said children shall be at all  times hold and enjoy the title of honour of "a Prince (or Princess) of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland":
Our Will and Pleasure further is that Our said Earl Marshal to whom the cognizance of matters of this nature doth properly belong do see this Our Order kept, and that the same be duly registered in Our College of Arms, to the end that Our Officers of Arms and all others upon occasion may take full notice and have knowledge thereof :
In witness whereof we have caused Our Great Seal to he affixed to these Presents.
Given at Our Court at Saint James's the        day of May, 1914; in the Fifth Year of Our Reign.

By the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas.
Signed with His Own Hand.

250,449/4

18.5.1914
Honours.
HO 45/10723

College of Arms
Infant son of Duke of Brunswick: style and designation.

submit observations on and suggest amendments to proposed warrant for H.M. signature.

Minutes

the first three of Garter's suggestions should not be adopted, I think, while the fourth is right.

? submit for signature warrant as in draft in ./3
It would perhaps be well to explain to Lord Satmfordham at the same time that the warrant is in general terms, and not restricted to the case of the new Prince.
J.F.H.
28/5/14

A.J.E
29.5.14

H.D. 13/6

W to HM 15 June

the warrant has been submitted to be signed by the King.
S.A.H. 17/6

W to Lord Chanc. for sealing 20 June

W to College of Arms for registration 14 July

Gazette of warrant. Send copy to F.O. for transmission to Brunswick.
H.G.S. 14/7/14
(Patent dated 17 June 1914)

Copy to F.O. 15 July

Gaz 17 July

I met the Prince of Hanover in Aug 1936 at a party at the British Embassy in Berlin, and he was amused when I told him that I recollected that the question of his status had given a lot of work at H.O. in 1914.  It seems doubtful from the F.O. within whether the final decision was communicated to the Minister of State of Brunswick before the war broke out.
J.F.H. 2/12/36


250449/4

College of Arms, E.C.
18th May 1914.

Sir,
In compliance with the request of the Secretary of State signified in your letter of the 12th instant (number 250,449/3) informing me that The King has been pleased to command that the style of the infant son of the Duke of Brunswick should be "His Highness" and that the designation should be "A Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland"; and that a Warrant giving effect to His Majesty's commands is to be submitted to Him for signature, a draft of which, enclosed with your letter, is herewith returned, I beg to observe that I have examined previous Warrants of a like nature, inter alia
(l) a Warrant under the Great Seal for the style of "Royal Highness" dated 30 January 7 Victoria
(2) a Warrant under the Great Seal for the Princess Royal and her children dated 9 November 1905 and
(3) a Warrant under the Sign Manual for the style of Princess Victoria Eugenie Julia Ena of Battenberg (now Queen of Spain) dated 30 April 1906.

In comparing these with the proposed Warrant for submission I am inclined to think that paragraph 3 should read
And whereas We are desirous of defining and fixing the style by which the issue of the said marriage shall be designated within Our Dominions.

but here two points are being settled: a style and a title or designation.  Our draft should stand.


That paragraph 4 should read
Know ye therefore that in the exercise of Our Royal and undoubted Prerogative and of Our Especial Grace We do hereby declare Our Royal Will and Pleasure that the children born to Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Brunswick and Luneburg shall have and at all times hold and enjoy the style, title or attribute of Highness with their titular dignity of Prince or Princess to their respective Christian names or with their other titles of honour.

This follows the letters patent of 1864, but I do not see why the wording should be more formal than the Princess Royal Wt. of 1905 (134513). ?let draft stand

That paragraph 8 might read
Witness Ourself at Saint James's the      day of   (&c).

This is part of usual formula for letters patent : this wt. is not letters patent (being simply a warrant under the Great Seal) our draft follows the terms e.g. of the Royal Consent to a marriage.

And that paragraph 9 should read
By The King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas,

I am, Sir,
your obedient servant
A.S. Scott-Gatty
Garter

To the Under Secretary of State
Home Office


250,449/4.

15th July,  1914.

Sir,
With reference to your letter (12135) of the 31st March last, I am directed by Mr. Secretary McKenna to forward, herewith, for transmission to the Minister of State of Brunswick, a copy of the Royal Warrant defining the style and designation of the children horn to Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Brunswick and Luneburg; and I am to say, for the information of Secretary Sir Edward Grey, that the official announcement of the issue of the Warrant will appear in Friday's Gazette.

I am,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,

The Under Secretary of State,
Foreign Office.


FOREIGN OFFICE, S.W. 1.

18th September 1936.

Dear Henderson,

I have looked up the point which you mentioned regarding the style of the son of the Duke and Duchess of Brunswick.

I find that our Ambassador in Berlin sent us a despatch, dated March 16th, 1914, in which he reported that the Minister of State of Brunswick had enquired whether the child of the Duke and Duchess could be considered by The King to be a Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with the style of Royal Highness. The Home Office informed us, in a letter (Ref. 250449/2) dated April 29th, that The King had directed that the style of the infant son of the Duke of Brunswick should be "His Highness" and that his designation should be "a "Prince of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland".  A copy of the Royal Warrant was sent to the Ambassador in Foreign Office despatch No.89 Treaty of July 20th, with instructions to forward it to the Minister of State of Brunswick.

It is, of course, conceivable that these instructions were not in fact carried out owing to the outbreak of war. I am afraid there is no record on our files.

I am sorry our telephone conversations were so frequently interrupted!

Yours sincerely,
R.M.A. Hankey


J.F. Henderson, Esq.


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